This interesting article in the New York Times regarding a so-called "patent troll," raises the obvious question:  If the patents are obviously no good and the claims of infringement clearly frivolous, how is it that supposedly top-notch lawyers must charge millions to show that to a judge? 

I found this statistic from the article telling: 

The eyes of the patent world were on Seattle this week as an Order denying injunctive relief was handed down in the ongoing Microsoft v. Motorola heavyweight title bout.

While I will leave it to others to discuss the minutiae and determine the implications for the industry, the main question on my mind is whether

Or, “Those Who Live By The Sword…”

Here’s an amusing little class action case filed in Seattle this week.  Seems  Coach, Inc., well known purveyors of high end handbags and such, in their never-ending zeal to protect innocent consumers from inferior (and, more reasonably priced) “knock off” goods, unleashed their New York lawyers to crack

As contingent-fee lawyers and supposed “patent trolls” to boot, my colleagues and I are blamed for many of the ills that plague society.  It is we — who do not get paid unless we are successful — who file merit-less cases, prolong litigation, waste resources, and cause innocent defendants to pay their lawyers upwards of