Photo of Philip P. Mann

Philip P. Mann is a trial lawyer with over twenty years experience litigating patent, trademark, trade secret, and other intellectual property matters throughout the country.
Mann's trial work has taken him to various federal and state courts where he's tried both cases to the court (a judge) as well as before juries. In addition to trial court work, Mann has performed appellate work before the United States Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit.
Mann began his legal career in Chicago and Milwaukee before heading to Seattle where some of America's most innovative companies were developing new technologies at breakneck speed. Before founding his own firm, he was a member of the Seattle Intellectual Property Law Firm, Christensen O'Connor Johnson Kindness.
Mann is an "AV" rated lawyer by Martindale Hubbell, indicative that he has reached the height of professional excellence and is recognized for the highest levels of skill and integrity.
He holds a degree in Electrical Engineering from the University of Illinois (Urbana) and received his law degree from the Washington University School of Law in St. Louis, Missouri. He is admitted to practice in the States of Illinois and Washington, as well as before the United States Patent and Trademark Office, and in various courts around the country.

It is interesting to note that in recent months, Internet giant Amazon.com has started to pay heed to complaints regarding counterfeit, “knock-off” goods being sold through the site.  Through the years, Amazon, aided by an apparently sympathetic judiciary,  has enjoyed effective legal immunity from claims of patent, copyright and trademark infringement by arguing that it

I was saddened to learn that Ray Niro died yesterday while vacationing in Italy.  For those of us engaged in contingent-fee patent litigation, Ray was the superstar, the source of inspiration — in short, the best there ever was.

I was fortunate to know Ray, although it came at a real cost to my client

I have now handled a couple of cases for small business people victimized by the irresistible on-line juggernaut known as Amazon.com.

In both cases, our clients were innocent victims of overseas scam artists who operate covertly, anonymously and well beyond the reach of U.S. courts.  In both cases, Amazon provided these scam artists with easy

It’s not often that I get upset over an adverse result in court.  It goes with the territory, and the only way never to lose is never to accept a challenge in the first place.

However, my equanimity in this regard is being tested — sorely.  And the source of my vexation is the Federal

Heh, heh, heh…ho, ho, ho,…whatever lead them to believe THAT?

The Federal Circuit, perhaps spurred on by the hysteria over “patent trolls,” continues to systematically extract whatever worn down, yellowed and decaying teeth remain in the patent laws.  Their recent decision in Akamai v. Limelight reaffirms the recently created “single entity” rule that essentially requires